Lighter Than Air

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The restorative elements of salt unite in a new spa experience that promotes healthy lungs and beautiful skin.

Imagine the delicious feeling of breathing salty sea air or walking on a beach and expanding your lungs. How does your skin feel? Likely smooth. Although salt is not often touted as beneficial to our bodies, at least when ingested, this miraculous crystal has been a beautifying and healing agent for centuries.

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Salt therapy, or halotherapy, is a drug-free alternative used to combat respiratory ailments and skin conditions, ranging from acne to eczema. Although relatively new in the United States, halotherapy is practiced widely in Eastern Europe where salt mines are prevalent. Aria Salt, opening in late February, is the first of its kind to open in Fort Worth

A halotherapy center consists of rooms comprised entirely of salt from the floor to the ceiling. At Aria Salt, approximately 35,000 pounds of sparkling Pink Himalayan Sea Salt were imported to create therapy rooms that owner Jordan Jones described as “stunning.” During 45-minute treatment sessions, a halogenerator fills these rooms with microscopic salt particles, which are inhaled deep into the lungs. “[The halogenerator] is the magic to make it work,” said Jones.

The salt particles are lighter than air, according to Jones. That might be the reason the name Aria, which translates to “air” in Italian, was chosen for the establishment.

In the mid-1800s, a Polish physician realized that men working in salt mines had a much lower rate of lung disease compared to those who worked outside the mines, according to Jones. This physician hypothesized that the inhalation of salt granules in the air contributed to this group’s overall health. Today, halotherapy is used to treat asthma, emphysema, cystic fibrosis, allergies, bronchitis, eczema, psoriasis and more.

Unlike more clinical therapy centers, Jones promises, “A little more luxury. A little more upgrade.” Each detail of Aria Salt was given thoughtful consideration to maximize health benefits and ensure relaxation. Zero gravity chairs and calming music encourage guests to get comfortable in a room where the salty walls literally glow.

For Jones, halotherapy was the answer to helping his nephew who has severe asthma. Referring to his business partner and cousin, Dustin Brown, he said, “We’re entrepreneurs at heart, but because there is a personal level to [halotherapy], that’s what made us plunge in and go for it.”

The excitement in his voice was contagious. The dynamic pair finished each other’s sentences and shared laughs in the way close family members often do. Both men have relatives who will directly benefit from the restorative elements offered in halotherapy.

In Jones’ opinion, it’s important to treat symptoms without medication when possible, especially in children. Brown echoed his sentiment with a nod. At Aria Salt, up to six children can play together in what resembles a scene from a sandbox in front of a wall-sized castle made from jagged salt blocks. Therapy rooms include one for children, one for up to six adults and two private rooms.

Salt therapy should be a supplement to medication, said Jones, not a replacement. After all, he is the self-described “salt guy, not scientist.” Single treatment sessions range from $30-$55; monthly and annual membership packages are available.

Aria Salt
6323 Camp Bowie Blvd., Ste. 141
Fort Worth, Texas 76116
817.732.SALT
ariasalt.com